Powerbeats pro
Joshua Kissi uses new Powerbeats pro colors to celebrate creatives

Powerbeats pro
Joshua Kissi uses new Powerbeats pro colors to celebrate creatives

Powerbeats pro
Joshua Kissi uses new Powerbeats pro colors to celebrate creatives

Kissi’s virtual photoshoot features the latest colors of Powerbeats Pro and four rising creatives.

For photographer and creative director Joshua Kissi, the goal was supposed to be simple: a photo series that showcases creatives in their natural settings. The catch? The whole “social distancing” thing.

But what seemed to be an obstacle became part of the story.

“After the world opens back up, I really want people to look back and be like, ‘Wow, like we were really, really in that,'” Joshua says. “'In that time, artists chose to continue to create.’”

Through an elaborate setup that involved two iPhones, a laptop, props and endless collaboration, he was able to remain in his NY home and create this intimate portrait series of creatives in their homes.

With the new colors of Powerbeats Pro, inspired by self expression, Joshua partnered each artist with a color that celebrated who they were.

In each series, there was a different story. A different experience.

“Everybody’s pretty much their own color in a sense, right, a different tone of color and what they choose to represent,” he says. “And I just always found that beautiful.”

Kissi’s virtual photoshoot features the latest colors of Powerbeats Pro and four rising creatives.

For photographer and creative director Joshua Kissi, the goal was supposed to be simple: a photo series that showcases creatives in their natural settings. The catch? The whole “social distancing” thing.

But what seemed to be an obstacle became part of the story.

“After the world opens back up, I really want people to look back and be like, ‘Wow, like we were really, really in that,'” Joshua says. “'In that time, artists chose to continue to create.’”

Through an elaborate setup that involved two iPhones, a laptop, props and endless collaboration, he was able to remain in his NY home and create this intimate portrait series of creatives in their homes.

With the new colors of Powerbeats Pro, inspired by self expression, Joshua partnered each artist with a color that celebrated who they were.

In each series, there was a different story. A different experience.

“Everybody’s pretty much their own color in a sense, right, a different tone of color and what they choose to represent,” he says. “And I just always found that beautiful.”

Kissi’s virtual photoshoot features the latest colors of Powerbeats Pro and four rising creatives.

For photographer and creative director Joshua Kissi, the goal was supposed to be simple: a photo series that showcases creatives in their natural settings. The catch? The whole “social distancing” thing.

But what seemed to be an obstacle became part of the story.

“After the world opens back up, I really want people to look back and be like, ‘Wow, like we were really, really in that,'” Joshua says. “'In that time, artists chose to continue to create.’”

Through an elaborate setup that involved two iPhones, a laptop, props and endless collaboration, he was able to remain in his NY home and create this intimate portrait series of creatives in their homes.

With the new colors of Powerbeats Pro, inspired by self expression, Joshua partnered each artist with a color that celebrated who they were.

In each series, there was a different story. A different experience.

“Everybody’s pretty much their own color in a sense, right, a different tone of color and what they choose to represent,” he says. “And I just always found that beautiful.”

Corey Wash

Corey Wash

Corey Wash

“When I look at the color blue I don’t just think of one thing. I think of multiple things in a spectrum of how it exists. Which is funny because when I think of who we are as Black people, there’s no one definition to define us and there’s no one way to be. I think of blue in the same way.”

“When I look at the color blue I don’t just think of one thing. I think of multiple things in a spectrum of how it exists. Which is funny because when I think of who we are as Black people, there’s no one definition to define us and there’s no one way to be. I think of blue in the same way.”

“When I look at the color blue I don’t just think of one thing. I think of multiple things in a spectrum of how it exists. Which is funny because when I think of who we are as Black people, there’s no one definition to define us and there’s no one way to be. I think of blue in the same way.”

Corey moved to New York in 2011 to become a model. But, like blue, she couldn’t be one thing, extending into photography, art direction, styling, directing, illustrating and painting.

Her paintings and illustrations are largely made up of bold, confrontational cartoons that tackle everything from misogyny and racism, to poverty. The things that speak to society, but also to her as an artist, a Black woman, a daughter, a mother.

She is in a constant state of evolution, always looking to push her artwork or take on a new medium.

Corey moved to New York in 2011 to become a model. But, like blue, she couldn’t be one thing, extending into photography, art direction, styling, directing, illustrating and painting.

Her paintings and illustrations are largely made up of bold, confrontational cartoons that tackle everything from misogyny and racism, to poverty. The things that speak to society, but also to her as an artist, a Black woman, a daughter, a mother.

She is in a constant state of evolution, always looking to push her artwork or take on a new medium.

Corey moved to New York in 2011 to become a model. But, like blue, she couldn’t be one thing, extending into photography, art direction, styling, directing, illustrating and painting.

Her paintings and illustrations are largely made up of bold, confrontational cartoons that tackle everything from misogyny and racism, to poverty. The things that speak to society, but also to her as an artist, a Black woman, a daughter, a mother.

She is in a constant state of evolution, always looking to push her artwork or take on a new medium.

As artists, we put so much pressure on each other to stay in our lane.

As artists, we put so much pressure on each other to stay in our lane.

As artists, we put so much pressure on each other to stay in our lane.

Corey Wash

Corey Wash

Corey Wash

“As artists we put so much pressure on each other to stay in our lane, and if we try to do anything different or anything new or evolve anything, then everybody’s like, ‘oh, I want this version of you forever ... don’t change,’” she says.

“I’m just always about breaking the rules.”

“As artists we put so much pressure on each other to stay in our lane, and if we try to do anything different or anything new or evolve anything, then everybody’s like, ‘oh, I want this version of you forever ... don’t change,’” she says.

“I’m just always about breaking the rules.”

“As artists we put so much pressure on each other to stay in our lane, and if we try to do anything different or anything new or evolve anything, then everybody’s like, ‘oh, I want this version of you forever ... don’t change,’” she says.

“I’m just always about breaking the rules.”

Sage Adams

Sage Adams

Sage Adams

“Red to me means ‘go,’ even though it's supposed to mean ‘stop.’ I'm always drawing these stop signs that say ‘go;’ I've been told to stop many times in my life where I've proceeded forward anyway. Red has always meant to stop me. And it never has.”

“Red to me means ‘go,’ even though it's supposed to mean ‘stop.’ I'm always drawing these stop signs that say ‘go;’ I've been told to stop many times in my life where I've proceeded forward anyway. Red has always meant to stop me. And it never has.”

“Red to me means ‘go,’ even though it's supposed to mean ‘stop.’ I'm always drawing these stop signs that say ‘go;’ I've been told to stop many times in my life where I've proceeded forward anyway. Red has always meant to stop me. And it never has.”

Like many Black and Brown kids, photographer, illustrator, and do-it-all Sage felt excluded from the galleries and traditions of the art world.

So Sage turned to the internet: partnering with friends and cofounding Art Hoe Collective, a movement that uplifts artists of color and knocks down the towering barriers of the art world. They started out with online curation, and quickly evolved to workshops and galleries for artists of color.

“The internet has allowed people like me, who did not know that they were even allowed to participate, call themselves artists,” Sage says. Though they've been able to help foster a generation of creatives via the internet, Sage says the art world still places a stigma on an artist ascending via the internet.

Like many Black and Brown kids, photographer, illustrator, and do-it-all Sage felt excluded from the galleries and traditions of the art world.

So Sage turned to the internet: partnering with friends and cofounding Art Hoe Collective, a movement that uplifts artists of color and knocks down the towering barriers of the art world. They started out with online curation, and quickly evolved to workshops and galleries for artists of color.

“The internet has allowed people like me, who did not know that they were even allowed to participate, call themselves artists,” Sage says. Though they've been able to help foster a generation of creatives via the internet, Sage says the art world still places a stigma on an artist ascending via the internet.

Like many Black and Brown kids, photographer, illustrator, and do-it-all Sage felt excluded from the galleries and traditions of the art world.

So Sage turned to the internet: partnering with friends and cofounding Art Hoe Collective, a movement that uplifts artists of color and knocks down the towering barriers of the art world. They started out with online curation, and quickly evolved to workshops and galleries for artists of color.

“The internet has allowed people like me, who did not know that they were even allowed to participate, call themselves artists,” Sage says. Though they've been able to help foster a generation of creatives via the internet, Sage says the art world still places a stigma on an artist ascending via the internet.

I make money on the internet from making art. But I don't want that to make me not a fine artist, or disqualify me from being in a museum.

I make money on the internet from making art. But I don't want that to make me not a fine artist, or disqualify me from being in a museum.

I make money on the internet from making art. But I don't want that to make me not a fine artist, or disqualify me from being in a museum.

Sage Adams

Sage Adams

Sage Adams

“I don’t care if people are like, ‘Oh, you’re an internet artist’ 'cause like, yes, I make money on the internet from making art,” Sage says. “But I don’t want that to make me not a fine artist, or disqualify me from being in a museum, you know?”

It certainly doesn’t seem to be slowing Sage down. Sage’s work as a curator, illustrator, photographer (the list goes on), has landed her features in galleries, fellowships, and R&B single covers alike.

Not bad for an “internet artist.”

“I don’t care if people are like, ‘Oh, you’re an internet artist’ ’cause like, yes, I make money on the internet from making art,” Sage says. “But I don’t want that to make me not a fine artist, or disqualify me from being in a museum, you know?”

It certainly doesn’t seem to be slowing Sage down. Sage’s work as a curator, illustrator, photographer (the list goes on), has landed her features in galleries, fellowships, and R&B single covers alike.

Not bad for an “internet artist.”

“I don’t care if people are like, ’Oh, you’re an internet artist’ ’cause like, yes, I make money on the internet from making art,” Sage says. “But I don’t want that to make me not a fine artist, or disqualify me from being in a museum, you know?”

It certainly doesn’t seem to be slowing Sage down. Sage’s work as a curator, illustrator, photographer (the list goes on), has landed her features in galleries, fellowships, and R&B single covers alike.

Not bad for an “internet artist.”

Gab, the Sandbox

Gab, the Sandbox

Gab, the Sandbox

“Pink is one of my favorite colors. It just represents my mood musically perfectly. Warm, welcoming, fun. As a boy, pink also means breaking grounds for the first time.”

“Pink is one of my favorite colors. It just represents my mood musically perfectly. Warm, welcoming, fun. As a boy, pink also means breaking grounds for the first time.”

“Pink is one of my favorite colors. It just represents my mood musically perfectly. Warm, welcoming, fun. As a boy, pink also means breaking grounds for the first time.”

At age 17, Gab was at a crossroad.

Move to North Carolina with your mom and attend college? Or do you stay in New York with your friends and start a boyband?

You can probably guess what he ended up doing ... and it didn’t involve school.

“With the internet, you can teach yourself anything,” Gab says.

At age 17, Gab was at a crossroad.

Move to North Carolina with your mom and attend college? Or do you stay in New York with your friends and start a boyband?

You can probably guess what he ended up doing ... and it didn’t involve school.

“With the internet, you can teach yourself anything,” Gab says.

At age 17, Gab was at a crossroad.

Move to North Carolina with your mom and attend college? Or do you stay in New York with your friends and start a boyband?

You can probably guess what he ended up doing ... and it didn’t involve school.

“With the internet, you can teach yourself anything,” Gab says.

We’re just pushing each other to become the best things we can be.

We’re just pushing each other to become the best things we can be.

We’re just pushing each other to become the best things we can be.

Gab, The Sandbox

Gab, The Sandbox

Gab, The Sandbox

In a quintessential creative bachelor pad, Gab and his 3 friends form Productive Honey: it’s part boyband, part merch line, part zine, part whatever crazy idea pops into their minds next. They seem to exist in a perpetual state of creativity.

“We’re just pushing each other to become the best things we can be,” says Gab.

In a quintessential creative bachelor pad, Gab and his 3 friends form Productive Honey: it’s part boyband, part merch line, part zine, part whatever crazy idea pops into their minds next. They seem to exist in a perpetual state of creativity.

“We’re just pushing each other to become the best things we can be,” says Gab.

In a quintessential creative bachelor pad, Gab and his 3 friends form Productive Honey: it’s part boyband, part merch line, part zine, part whatever crazy idea pops into their minds next. They seem to exist in a perpetual state of creativity.

“We’re just pushing each other to become the best things we can be,” says Gab.

Mellany Sanchez

Mellany Sanchez

Mellany Sanchez

“My strongest association with yellow would be in the material gold. The way that gold serves me in my style is so important and also turns back to that New York story ... I’m not so much the flower girl.”

“My strongest association with yellow would be in the material gold. The way that gold serves me in my style is so important and also turns back to that New York story ... I’m not so much the flower girl.”

“My strongest association with yellow would be in the material gold. The way that gold serves me in my style is so important and also turns back to that New York story ... I’m not so much the flower girl.”

Mellany is a born and bred New Yorker — and if you didn’t know it, her wardrobe would give it away.

The sense of comfort and confidence. The dark colors. The efficiency and utilitarianism. The street sensibilities. The attitude. It's all born from a sense of community her city provided.

Mellany is a born and bred New Yorker — and if you didn’t know it, her wardrobe would give it away.

The sense of comfort and confidence. The dark colors. The efficiency and utilitarianism. The street sensibilities. The attitude. It's all born from a sense of community her city provided.

Mellany is a born and bred New Yorker — and if you didn’t know it, her wardrobe would give it away.

The sense of comfort and confidence. The dark colors. The efficiency and utilitarianism. The street sensibilities. The attitude. It's all born from a sense of community her city provided.

You have to continue to educate yourself. You’ve got to know what’s out there to know what’s not out there.

You have to continue to educate yourself. You’ve got to know what’s out there to know what’s not out there.

You have to continue to educate yourself. You’ve got to know what’s out there to know what’s not out there.

Mellany Sanchez

Mellany Sanchez

Mellany Sanchez

But taste isn’t a matter of living in a fashion mecca or happening to like the right stuff. It’s research. Combing through vintage magazines, watching what’s happening, doing whatever she can to stay both on top of current trends, and predict future ones.

“You have to continue to educate yourself. You’ve got to know what’s out there to know what’s not out there,” she says.

After coming up on fashion forums and studying communications in college, she moved through streetwear brands and fashion publications before eventually breaking out as a stylist. Today her stylings can be found on some of the biggest names in music.

And New York is always at the heart of it all.

“It’s important to me, to always bring that identity where I go,” she says.

But taste isn’t a matter of living in a fashion mecca or happening to like the right stuff. It’s research. Combing through vintage magazines, watching what’s happening, doing whatever she can to stay both on top of current trends, and predict future ones.

“You have to continue to educate yourself. You’ve got to know what’s out there to know what’s not out there,” she says.

After coming up on fashion forums and studying communications in college, she moved through streetwear brands and fashion publications before eventually breaking out as a stylist. Today her stylings can be found on some of the biggest names in music.

And New York is always at the heart of it all.

“It’s important to me, to always bring that identity where I go,” she says.

But taste isn’t a matter of living in a fashion mecca or happening to like the right stuff. It’s research. Combing through vintage magazines, watching what’s happening, doing whatever she can to stay both on top of current trends, and predict future ones.

“You have to continue to educate yourself. You’ve got to know what’s out there to know what’s not out there,” she says.

After coming up on fashion forums and studying communications in college, she moved through streetwear brands and fashion publications before eventually breaking out as a stylist. Today her stylings can be found on some of the biggest names in music.

And New York is always at the heart of it all.

“It’s important to me, to always bring that identity where I go,” she says.

Behind the scenes with Joshua Kissi: watch to see more about the making of the photoseries

Behind the scenes with Joshua Kissi: watch to see more about the making of the photoseries

Behind the scenes with Joshua Kissi: watch to see more about the making of the photoseries

The product behind the story

The product behind the story

The product behind the story