Africa Now
How Cuppy became an ambassador for African music

Africa Now
How Cuppy became an ambassador for African music

Africa Now
How Cuppy became an ambassador for African music

Cuppy "Africa Now"

Her Apple Music show “Africa Now” is her latest effort to empower African music

It’s a busy afternoon for Cuppy. On top of this interview, she’ll stop midway to conduct an interview of her own for her new Apple Music show “Africa Now,” the streaming platform’s first radio show dedicated to African music.

“It’s an opportunity to not only share what Africa has to offer with the world, but hopefully open up the world more to Africa,” Cuppy says.

It’s a testament to the rising global influence of African genres like Afrobeat and Highlife. For Cuppy, it’s the continuation of a life’s journey.

Her Apple Music show “Africa Now” is her latest effort to empower African music

It’s a busy afternoon for Cuppy. On top of this interview, she’ll stop midway to conduct an interview of her own for her new Apple Music show “Africa Now,” the streaming platform’s first radio show dedicated to African music.

“It’s an opportunity to not only share what Africa has to offer with the world, but hopefully open up the world more to Africa,” Cuppy says.

It’s a testament to the rising global influence of African genres like Afrobeat and Highlife. For Cuppy, it’s the continuation of a life’s journey.

Her Apple Music show “Africa Now” is her latest effort to empower African music

It’s a busy afternoon for Cuppy. On top of this interview, she’ll stop midway to conduct an interview of her own for her new Apple Music show “Africa Now,” the streaming platform’s first radio show dedicated to African music.

“It’s an opportunity to not only share what Africa has to offer with the world, but hopefully open up the world more to Africa,” Cuppy says.

It’s a testament to the rising global influence of African genres like Afrobeat and Highlife. For Cuppy, it’s the continuation of a life’s journey.

An iPod and a dream
An iPod and a dream
An iPod and a dream
Cuppy "Africa Now"

Cuppy grew up in Lagos, the largest city and cultural hub of Nigeria. Home was a place where more films were produced than Hollywood, where Highlife filled the air and the children were introduced to drumming at an early age. The foundations for her love of music were established.

“We’ve always had a beat instilled inside of us,” says Cuppy. “We see the power and the meaningfulness behind music.”

But at the age of 13, Cuppy and her sister were sent to London for school — sending her thousands of miles — and worlds away — from the only home she ever knew. The only slice of home she had was an iPod loaded with scrappy field recordings of all her favorite African songs.

Cuppy grew up in Lagos, the largest city and cultural hub of Nigeria. Home was a place where more films were produced than Hollywood, where Highlife filled the air and the children were introduced to drumming at an early age. The foundations for her love of music were established.

“We’ve always had a beat instilled inside of us,” says Cuppy. “We see the power and the meaningfulness behind music.”

But at the age of 13, Cuppy and her sister were sent to London for school — sending her thousands of miles — and worlds away — from the only home she ever knew. The only slice of home she had was an iPod loaded with scrappy field recordings of all her favorite African songs.

Cuppy grew up in Lagos, the largest city and cultural hub of Nigeria. Home was a place where more films were produced than Hollywood, where Highlife filled the air and the children were introduced to drumming at an early age. The foundations for her love of music were established.

“We’ve always had a beat instilled inside of us,” says Cuppy. “We see the power and the meaningfulness behind music.”

But at the age of 13, Cuppy and her sister were sent to London for school — sending her thousands of miles — and worlds away — from the only home she ever knew. The only slice of home she had was an iPod loaded with scrappy field recordings of all her favorite African songs.

We’ve always had a beat instilled inside of us. We see the power and the meaningfulness behind music.

We’ve always had a beat instilled inside of us. We see the power and the meaningfulness behind music.

We’ve always had a beat instilled inside of us. We see the power and the meaningfulness behind music.

Cuppy "Africa Now"

When she felt alienated, bullied, or or simply longed for the warmth and comfort of the African sun, Cuppy would turn to that iPod.

“For those three minutes, I didn’t feel like I was in a foreign place,” she says.

When she felt alienated, bullied, or or simply longed for the warmth and comfort of the African sun, Cuppy would turn to that iPod.

“For those three minutes, I didn’t feel like I was in a foreign place,” she says.

When she felt alienated, bullied, or or simply longed for the warmth and comfort of the African sun, Cuppy would turn to that iPod.

“For those three minutes, I didn’t feel like I was in a foreign place,” she says.

Coming of age in London meant that Cuppy was introduced to pop, house and electronic music. Attending raves as a teen, she says, was the start of her journey as a DJ. She would weave Afrobeat, Highlife, Afro-soul and other African genres with house and electronic. It would become a revolutionary sound — but like any great revolution, it was met with resistance.

“I remember going to gigs and being told, ‘you can’t play Afrobeat,’” she says. But over time, African music’s prominence became too big to be restricted, and her sound took off.

As she moved to New York to study for a master’s degree in music business, she added hip hop to her list of influences, creating a global tapestry that represented not just Lagos, London, and New York, but a slice of the African diaspora as a whole.

Coming of age in London meant that Cuppy was introduced to pop, house and electronic music. Attending raves as a teen, she says, was the start of her journey as a DJ. She would weave Afrobeat, Highlife, Afro-soul and other African genres with house and electronic. It would become a revolutionary sound — but like any great revolution, it was met with resistance.

“I remember going to gigs and being told, ‘you can’t play Afrobeat,’” she says. But over time, African music’s prominence became too big to be restricted, and her sound took off.

As she moved to New York to study for a master’s degree in music business, she added hip hop to her list of influences, creating a global tapestry that represented not just Lagos, London, and New York, but a slice of the African diaspora as a whole.

Coming of age in London meant that Cuppy was introduced to pop, house and electronic music. Attending raves as a teen, she says, was the start of her journey as a DJ. She would weave Afrobeat, Highlife, Afro-soul and other African genres with house and electronic. It would become a revolutionary sound — but like any great revolution, it was met with resistance.

“I remember going to gigs and being told, ‘you can’t play Afrobeat,’” she says. But over time, African music’s prominence became too big to be restricted, and her sound took off.

As she moved to New York to study for a master’s degree in music business, she added hip hop to her list of influences, creating a global tapestry that represented not just Lagos, London, and New York, but a slice of the African diaspora as a whole.

I remember going to gigs and being told ‘you can’t play Afrobeat’

I remember going to gigs and being told ‘you can’t play Afrobeat’

I remember going to gigs and being told ‘you can’t play Afrobeat’

“It’s basically made me this big sponge where I’m able to soak in different cultures,” Cuppy says. “I wouldn’t change it for the world.”

“It’s basically made me this big sponge where I’m able to soak in different cultures,” Cuppy says. “I wouldn’t change it for the world.”

“It’s basically made me this big sponge where I’m able to soak in different cultures,” Cuppy says. “I wouldn’t change it for the world.”

Cuppy "Africa Now"
For Africa
For Africa
For Africa

Thanks to streaming platforms and an increasingly globalized world, African music has surged into the global spotlight. This ascension also gets a huge boost from collaborations with artists in hip hop, RnB and other music across the Black diaspora.

“In a world where people are desperate to find their identity, everyone is running back to Africa,” she says. “And if you can’t be there, then what can you do? You can express yourself through our music.“

Cuppy’s “Africa Now” celebrates African music’s prominence in culture, giving listeners a sense of Africa’s current soundscape and rich musical history. It’s not just about her hometown Lagos, or her home country Nigeria, but Kenya, Somalia, and as much of Africa that she can represent. Through this show, Cuppy looks forward to learning more about African music and expanding her knowledge of it.

Thanks to streaming platforms and an increasingly globalized world, African music has surged into the global spotlight. This ascension also gets a huge boost from collaborations with artists in hip hop, RnB and other music across the Black diaspora.

“In a world where people are desperate to find their identity, everyone is running back to Africa,” she says. “And if you can’t be there, then what can you do? You can express yourself through our music.“

Cuppy’s “Africa Now” celebrates African music’s prominence in culture, giving listeners a sense of Africa’s current soundscape and rich musical history. It’s not just about her hometown Lagos, or her home country Nigeria, but Kenya, Somalia, and as much of Africa that she can represent. Through this show, Cuppy looks forward to learning more about African music and expanding her knowledge of it.

Thanks to streaming platforms and an increasingly globalized world, African music has surged into the global spotlight. This ascension also gets a huge boost from collaborations with artists in hip hop, RnB and other music across the Black diaspora.

“In a world where people are desperate to find their identity, everyone is running back to Africa,” she says. “And if you can’t be there, then what can you do? You can express yourself through our music.“

Cuppy’s “Africa Now” celebrates African music’s prominence in culture, giving listeners a sense of Africa’s current soundscape and rich musical history. It’s not just about her hometown Lagos, or her home country Nigeria, but Kenya, Somalia, and as much of Africa that she can represent. Through this show, Cuppy looks forward to learning more about African music and expanding her knowledge of it.

In a world where people are desperate to find their identity, everyone is running back to Africa

In a world where people are desperate to find their identity, everyone is running back to Africa

In a world where people are desperate to find their identity, everyone is running back to Africa

Cuppy "Africa Now"

“I am covering 54 different countries on my show. It’s a lot to take in, but it is the most amazing journey.”

And what an amazing journey it’s been for Cuppy. At just age 27, she’s done just about everything in the industry. From deejaying and curating, to working as a music exec, hosting this radio show and even developing her own music. Her upcoming debut, “Original Copy,” will feature 13 African artists.

No matter what she does, it’s all about the Motherland.

“My job is to really make sure that I’m bringing everything back to the passion of and the love for African music,” says Cuppy. “That’s what it’s about.”

“I am covering 54 different countries on my show. It’s a lot to take in, but it is the most amazing journey.”

And what an amazing journey it’s been for Cuppy. At just age 27, she’s done just about everything in the industry. From deejaying and curating, to working as a music exec, hosting this radio show and even developing her own music. Her upcoming debut, “Original Copy,” will feature 13 African artists.

No matter what she does, it’s all about the Motherland.

“My job is to really make sure that I’m bringing everything back to the passion of and the love for African music,” says Cuppy. “That’s what it’s about.”

“I am covering 54 different countries on my show. It’s a lot to take in, but it is the most amazing journey.”

And what an amazing journey it’s been for Cuppy. At just age 27, she’s done just about everything in the industry. From deejaying and curating, to working as a music exec, hosting this radio show and even developing her own music. Her upcoming debut, “Original Copy,” will feature 13 African artists.

No matter what she does, it’s all about the Motherland.

“My job is to really make sure that I’m bringing everything back to the passion of and the love for African music,” says Cuppy. “That’s what it’s about.”

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